Major and Minor

Major in Classics

Undergraduate Advisor: Prof. Jacques A. Bromberg

Classics is an interdisciplinary program devoted to the study of the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. Students may focus on the Classics Language track or the Classical Civilization track. Besides the sequences in the Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit languages, the Department offers courses in Greek and Roman archaeology, history, linguistics, literature (including comparative literature), mythology, philosophy, and social history. 

The Classics Language track involves the study of texts in the ancient languages, while the Classical Civilization track makes use of these same texts in English translations. Both Classics tracks qualify graduates for appropriate careers in teaching and library work but can also be used as preparation for non-classical academic and professional disciplines such as business, law, and medicine. Students have combined a major in classics with a second major or certificate such as anthropology, biology, communication, computer science, history, history of art and architecture, history and philosophy of science, nonclassical languages and literatures, psychology, and women's studies.

Students planning graduate study in classics may be required to obtain reading competency in German, French, or Italian. Such study might begin during the course of completing the undergraduate major or may be undertaken in graduate school.

Major Requirements

The general rules and requirements for the Classics major, regardless of the track chosen, are as follows:

  • The Classics major requires a minimum of 30 credits with an overall 2.00 QPA in courses counting toward the major. A maximum of two courses may be taken toward the major under the S/N option.

  • Except for placement by examination in the language sequences, credit by examination is generally not granted, but the department will consider students with special circumstances. 

  • All majors, regardless of track, must complete a "writing intensive" (WRIT) course in Classics. This requirement is most easily satisfied with one of several WRIT courses currently offered by the Classics Faculty, including Think Like a Roman (CLASS 1640) and Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASS 1650).

  • For the "related area" required by the Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences, the classics department recommends other departments' courses in ancient Greek and Roman archaeology and art, history, linguistics, literature, philosophy, religion, and science.

 

The Classics Language Track

Since advanced knowledge of ancient Greek and Latin remain essential to graduate admissions and professional success in the discipline, the Languages Track is most often recommended to students interested in pursuing graduate study in classics. Thirty credits in language courses (i.e. with GREEK or LATIN subject codes) are required. Students may emphasize one language if they wish, or distribute their coursework evenly between the two languages. Regardless, these thirty credits must include the following:

  1. At least six credits in Greek or Latin courses beyond the fourth semester. The first four semesters of ancient Greek and Latin introduce students to the grammar and vocabulary of the ancient languages and give students their first experiences in reading prose (fall) and verse (spring). Majors are required to take at least two courses (or the equivalent) beyond the intermediate level. These courses have numbers in the 1000s, such as Advanced Readings in Greek Drama (GREEK 1402).
  2. A course in Prose Composition. Language majors must take either Greek Prose Composition (GREEK 1700) or Latin Prose Composition (LATIN 1700).
  3. Two semesters of a second ancient language. Classical Language majors may emphasize one language more than the other if they wish, but every student is required to take at least two semesters of Greek and at least two semesters of Latin. A student with advanced knowledge of Latin, who has taken Latin Prose Composition, must still take two semesters of ancient Greek at any level (e.g., Beginning Ancient Greek 1 and Beginning Ancient Greek 2); and conversely, a student pursuing advanced study in ancient Greek must still take at least two semesters of Latin at any level.

Sample Classical Languages Major

Course Name and Number Credits Semester Notes

Beginning Latin 1 (LATIN 0101)

4

Freshman fall

Introductory language course, primary language

Beginning Latin 2 (LATIN 0102)

4

Freshman spring

Introductory language course, primary language

Beginning Ancient Greek 1 (GREEK 0101)

4

Sophomore fall

Introductory language couse, secondary language

Intermediate Latin Prose (LATIN 0210)

3

Sophomore fall

Intermediate language course, primary language

Beginning Ancient Greek 2 (GREEK 0102)

4

Sophomore spring

Introductory language course, secondary language

Intermediate Latin Verse (LATIN 0220)

3

Sophomore spring

Intermediate language course, primary language

Intermediate Greek

3

JuniorfFall, abroad ICCS

Study abroad in Rome

Advanced Latin

3

Junior fall, abroad ICCS 

Study abroad in Rome

Advanced Readings in Latin: Elegy (LATIN 1412) 3 Junior spring Advanced language course, primary language

Think Like a Roman (CLASS 1640)

3

Senior fall

WRIT course

Latin Prose Composition (LATIN 1700)

3

Senior fall

Prose Composition course, primary language

Advanced Readings in Greek: Lyric (GREEK 1406)

3

Senior spring

Advanced language course, secondary language

 

The Classical Civilization Track

This track has five requirements, which may be satisfied by courses offered in, or cross-listed with, the Department of Classics. Those components are:

  1. Two survey courses in Greek and Roman history or civilization. The Classics Faculty regularly offer four courses that satisfy this requirements. Students are asked to take either Greek Civilization (CLASS 0010) or Greek History (CLASS 1210) AND either Roman Civilization (CLASS 0020) or Roman History (CLASS 1220).

  2. Two semesters of Greek or Latin. Any two courses with GREEK or LATIN subject codes will satisfy this requirement. For instance, Beginning Ancient Greek 1 (GREEK 0101) and Beginning Ancient Greek 2 (GREEK 102).

  3. Three courses in an approved area of concentration (AOC). A student's area of concentration is chosen in consultation with the Undergraduate Advisor and depends on a student's interests and plans for after graduation. Popular areas of concentration in Classics include: myth and culture, language and literature, classical philosophy, ancient history, art and archaeology, ancient religion. The Classics Faculty regularly offers courses in these areas, making it simple for students to choose courses that meet their interests and program needs. Taking three semesters of Greek or Latin beyond the required second semester (see requirement #1, above) will also satisfy this requirement.

  4. Three interdisciplinary electives outside the chosen area of concentration. Students must take one course from each of three different areas outside of their AOC, chosen from myth and culture, language and literature, classical philosophy, ancient history, art and archaeology, ancient religion. For instance, a major with a concentration in art and archaeology must take three courses in three different areas outside of art and archaeology: a literature course, a philosophy course, and a religion course, for example. Students may count a third course in Greek or Latin beyond the required second semester (see above) toward this requirement.

  5. A Writing Intensive (WRIT) course in Classics. This requirement is most easily satisfied with one of several WRIT courses currently offered by the Classics Faculty, including Think Like a Roman (CLASS 1640) and Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASS 1650).

Sample Classical Civlization Major

Course Name and Number Credits Semester Notes

Mythology in the Ancient World (CLASS 0030)

3

Freshman Fall

First interdisciplinary elective (myth and culture)

Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology (CLASS 0600)

3

Freshman Spring

First course in AOC (art and archaeology)

Beginning Latin 1 (LATIN 0101)

4

Sophomore Fall

First semester of an ancient language

Roman History (CLASS 1220)

3

Sophomore Fall

First survey course (Roman)

Beginning Latin 2 (LATIN 0102)

4

Sophomore Spring

Second semester of an ancient language (language requirement complete)

Greek Archaeology (CLASS 1600)

3

Sophmore Summer (abroad)

Second course in AOC (art and archaeology)

Mediterranean Crossroads (CLASS 1154)

3

Sophmore Summer (abroad)

Second interdisciplinary elective (literature)

Greek History (CLASS 1210)

3

Junior Fall

Second survey course (Greek; survey requirement complete)

Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean (CLASS 1650)

3

Junior Spring

Third course in AOC (art and archaeology; concentration requirement complete); also WRIT course

History of Ancient Philosophy (CLASS 0300)

3

Senior Fall

Third interdisciplinary elective (philosophy)

 

Majors who have reached the end of the junior year with a QPA in departmental courses of 3.50 or higher may, in conjunction with a senior-level course, write an honors essay. Acceptance of the essay by the department will qualify the student for graduating with departmental honors in classics or classical civilization. No thesis or capstone is currently required for the Classics major.

Undergraduate Studies Web site’s Majors, Minors, and Certificates landing page: https://www.asundergrad.pitt.edu/academic-experience/majors-minors-and-certificates

Minor in Classics

The Department of Classics offers four minors: Latin, Ancient Greek, Classical Civilization and Mediterranean Art and Archaeology. 

 

Latin Minor

The student must take at least 15 credits of LATIN courses to satisfy the requirements of the Latin minor. For example, Beginning Latin 1 and 2 (LATIN 0101 and 0102), Intermediate Latin Prose (LATIN 0210), and Intermediate Latin Verse (LATIN 0220), and one course beyond the intermediate level.

Sample Latin Minor

Name

Level

Credits

LATIN 0101

Beginning 1

4 credits

LATIN 0102

Beginning 2

4 credits

LATIN 0210

Intermediate Prose

3 credits

LATIN 0220

Intermediate Verse

3 credits

LATIN 1402

Advanced 3 credits

 

Ancient Greek Minor

The student must take at least 15 credits of GREEK courses to satisfy the requirements of the Greek minor. For example, Beginning Ancient Greek 1 and 2 (GREEK 0101 and 0102,), Intermediate Greek Prose (GREEK 0210), and Intermediate Greek Verse (GREEK 0220), and one course beyond the intermediate level.

Sample Greek Minor

Name

Level

Credits

GREEK 0101

Beginning 1

4 credits

GREEK 0102

Beginning 2

4 credits

GREEK 0210

Intermediate Prose

3 credits

GREEK 0220

Intermediate Verse

3 credits

GREEK 1400

Advanced 3 credits

 

Classical Civilization Minor

15 credits in Classics, Greek, or Latin courses, including at least one survey course in Greek civilization or history (3 credits), one survey course in Roman civilization or history (3 credits), and one course with a literary or textual component (3 credits), and one course in any other subfield of Classics, such as art, architecture, archaeology or philosophy (3 credits). Any Greek or Latin course may count toward the literary/textual requirement.

For the Classical Civilization minor, no language courses are required, although language courses may be counted, if the student wishes.

Sample Classical Civlization Minor

Course Name and Number

Credits

Semester

Notes

CLASS 1210 Greek History

3 credits Sophomore Fall Greek survey course

CLASS 1220 Roman History

3 credits

Sophomore Spring

Roman survey course

CLASS 1142 Ancient Epic

3 credits

Junior Fall

literature course

CLASS 0030 Mythology in the Ancient World

3 credits

Junior Fall

interdisciplinary elective

CLASS 1650 Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean

3 credits

Junior Spring

interdisciplinary elective

 

Mediterranean Art and Archaeology Minor

15 credits are required to complete the Mediterranean Art and Archaeology Minor. Of these, 12 credits are required courses, with the remainder being chosen from a list of electives in Classics, HAA, Anthropology, and Religious Studies.

Required Core Course (3 cr)    

CLASS 0600

 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology

3 credits

At least 1 of the following (3 cr)    

CLASS 0010

Greek Civilization

3 credits

CLASS 0020

Roman Civilization

3 credits

CLASS 1210/HIST 1783

Greek History

3 credits

CLASS 1220/HIST 1781

Roman History

3 credits

At least 2 of the following (6 cr)    

CLASS 0500/HAA 0150

Ancient Art

3 credits

CLASS 1510/HAA 1110

Greek Art

3 credits

CLASS 1520/HAA 1130

Roman Art

3 credits

ARC 1152/CLASS 1524/HAA 1160

Roman Architecture

3 credits

CLASS 1610

Greek Archaeology

3 credits

CLASS 1022

The Augustan Age

3 credits

CLASS 1216

Alexander and the Hellenistic Age

3 credits

HAA 0105

Art and Empire

3 credits

ARC 0182 City of Rome and its Architecture

3 credits

At least 1 of the following (3 cr)    

ANTH 0534

Prehistoric Foundations of European Civilization

3 credits

ANTH 0538

The Archaeologist Looks at Death

3 credits

ANTH 0630

Forensic Anthropology

3 credits

ANTH 1535

Basic Archaeological Field Training

3 credits

CLASS 0032/HIST 1746

Athletics of the Ancient World

3 credits

CLASS 04010/HAA 0160

Ancient Empires

3 credits

CLASS 0618/HAA 0018

Death in the Ancient World

3 credits

CLASS 0650

Archaeology of the Body

3 credits

CLASS 1630

Marginality in the Ancient Greek World

3 credits

CLASS 1650

Warfare in the Ancient Mediterranean

3 credits

CLASS 1900

Internship in Classics

1-5 credits

HAA 0165

Gods and Kings: Art in Ancient Mesopotamia

3 credits

ARC 1183

Digital Roman Africa: Visualizing Architecture and Urbanism in Roman North Africa

3 credits

RELGST 1100

Israel in the Biblical Age

3 credits

RELGST 1160/HAA 1105

Jerusalem: History and Imagination

3 credits

RELGST 1170

Archaeology of Israel-Palestine

3 credits

 

 

For advice on possible plans of study, please consult with undergraduate advisor, 
Professor Jacques A. Bromberg