Research

Jacques A. Bromberg Alexandra Cologer, Jonathan Dyer, Sophie Elvin, Reid Frye, Emily Hrynko, Gabrielle Kosobucki, Emma Lange, Tianke Li, Darien Pepple, Elise Pura, Sarah Schilpp, Joy Shon, Natalie Siracusa, Stephen Susa, Sophie Tannenbaum
May, 2017
Art and Archaeology | Project

As part of their presentations in Classics 1610 ("Greek Archaeology"), this year's Pitt in Sicily students created 360° videos at sites around the island. You can view the videos on YouTube by searching "Pitt in Sicily", or simply clicking ...

Mae J. Smethurst
March, 2017
Reception Studies | Public Lecture

Prof. Smethurst spoke about the history of performances of Greek tragedy in Japan with a focus on the productions of “Trojan Women” and “Medea” by Suzuki Tadashi, Ninagawa Yukio, and Miyagi Satoshi.

Mae J. Smethurst
March, 2017
Greek Language and Literature, Reception Studies | Journal Article

A great distance―spatial, temporal, and cultural―stretches between fifth - century BCE Greece and the fourteenth/fifteenth-century CE Japan, when the best-known writers of tragedy(Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides)and of noh(Kan’ami, Zeami, and Zenchiku)created...

Christian Wildberg
February, 2017
Ancient Philosophy and Science | Book Chapter

Proclus (412-485 A.D.) was one of the last official "successors" of Plato at the head of the Academy in Athens at the end of Antiquity, before the school was finally closed down in 529. As a prolific author of systematic works on a wide range of topics and one of...

A. J. Korzeniewski
November, 2016
Latin Language and Literature | Conference Presentation

Dr. Korzeniewski's talk discussed the maturation of Venus in the Aeneid and her coming to accept Aeneas’ fated destiny. The full conference program may be found here.

Hans-Peter Stahl
March, 2016
Latin Language and Literature | Book

In recent decades, international research on Virgil has been marked, if not dominated, by the ideas of the 'Harvard school' and similar trends, according to which the poet was engaged in an elaborate work of subtle subversion, directed against the new ruler of the...

Edwin D. Floyd
March, 2016
Greek Language and Literature | Conference Presentation
Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver
January, 2016
Art and Archaeology | Journal Article

‘Dark tourism’ is generally defined as travel to sites associated with suffering, death, or the macabre. In the modern world, popular dark tourism destinations include bloody battlefields such as Gallipoli and Waterloo, sites of disaster like Chernobyl and the World...

Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver
October, 2015
Art and Archaeology | Journal Article

Virginia Magazine turned to U.Va. academics from six disciplines and asked them how each of their respective fields interprets the supernatural—spirits, visions, the undead and more: Archaeologists generally agree that the ancient Greeks believed in things that we...

Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver
September, 2015
Art and Archaeology | Book

Sicily was among one of the first areas settled during the Greek colonization movement, making its cemeteries a popular area of study for scholars of the classical world. Yet these studies have often considered human remains and burial customs separately. In this...

Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver
June, 2015
Art and Archaeology | Journal Article

For the ancient Greeks, the dead were subjects of both fear and supplication. Necrophobia, or the fear of the dead, is a concept that has been present in Greek culture since the Neolithic period. At the heart of this phobia is the belief that corpses are able to...

Sophia Taborski
April, 2015
Art and Archaeology | Scholarship

With the exception of extispicy scenes catalogued by Francois Lissarrague and snake-eagle omens discussed by Diana Rodríguez Pérez, divination has been ignored by vase-painting scholars and of ancient religion scholars, only Michael Flower has touched on visual...

A. J. Korzeniewski
April, 2015
Latin Language and Literature | Conference Presentation
Christian Wildberg
December, 2014
Ancient Philosophy and Science | Book Chapter

The problem of responsibility in moral philosophy has been lively debated in the last decades, especially since the publication of Harry Frankfurt's seminal paper, "Alternate possibilities and moral responsibility" (1969). Compatibilists - also known as "soft"...

Mae J. Smethurst
October, 2014
Greek Language and Literature, Reception Studies | Scholarship
Christina M. Hoenig
July, 2014
Ancient Philosophy and Science | Journal Article

This paper examines Calcidius’ position in the notorious interpretative controversy over Plato’s dialogue Timaeus. Despite Calcidius’ far-reaching influence on the later philosophical and theological tradition, his contribution to the history of this debate has...

D. Mark Possanza
May, 2014
Latin Language and Literature | Journal Article
Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver T.J. Smith
January, 2014
Art and Archaeology | Book Chapter

Death can be an uncomfortable subject. Yet, much of what we know about ancient societies comes from funerary contexts, making discussions of death in the classroom unavoidable. Indeed elements of religion and the supernatural (itself a difficult topic), the funeral...

Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver R.J.A Wilson
January, 2014
Art and Archaeology | Journal Article

Excavations at Punta Secca, Sicily (Italy), in 2008 uncovered a substantially built tomb of ca ad 625/630 inside a private house and accompanying evidence for libations and funerary feasting in honour of the deceased. Inside the tomb were the skeletal remains of an...

Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver R.J.A Wilson, J.W.Hayes
January, 2014
Art and Archaeology | Journal Article
D. Mark Possanza
December, 2013
Latin Language and Literature | Journal Article
Christian Wildberg
November, 2013
Ancient Philosophy and Science | Book Chapter

The authors of this collection of essays explore di4erent ways that ancient Jews and Christians understood the world's creation and how this understanding shaped their world. In this volume discussions of cosmogony are not only placed within the contexts of biblical...

Jacques A. Bromberg
October, 2013
Ancient History and Society | Journal Article
Nicholas F. Jones
April, 2013
Ancient History and Society | Book Chapter
Matthew Bowser
March, 2013
Ancient History and Society | Scholarship

In the "Aeneid," Vergil dramatically announces through the character of Anchises that Caesar Augustus is destined to bring the Golden Age to Rome, an era of great peace, security and prosperity. The concept of this “Golden Age” pervades the Augustan period of Roman...